No, I will not laugh at people lying drunk in the street.

There is a summary at the end of this post for anyone who struggles with the full text.

I appear to be one of few people this year who isn’t relishing in laughing at and mocking people who have got intoxicated to the point they’re collapsing in the street, with little thought to the circumstances that may have led to them getting into that situation in the first place.

There is one in particular that has popularised this trend of mocking circumstances people find themselves in. The photograph pictured, by Joel Goodman, been described as a ‘perfect’ scene; with ideal lighting, vivid colours, well framed and with an extraordinary look of one of Britain’s streets being policed on New Year’s Eve has been shared hundreds and thousands if not millions of times in the first few days of 2016. It’s a chaotic scene that shows a man lying on the ground in the street in the background. There is a man held down on the floor by two police officers at the forefront while a woman, dressed up for a night out leans over, seemingly trying to say something to him or them. A crowd stand around watching in the background.

What’s happening in this photo? The way it’s being shared is completely devoid of context but the assumption is that they’re knock-down drunk. That they gave overindulged, been drinking heavily on New Year’s Eve and have lost control of themselves to some degree. While the background has now been explained to some degree by the Manchester Evening News, it wasn’t known at the time it went viral. Most of those sharing and laughing at it will not be looking to find out the context and simply have no idea. At a glance, without that context, we don’t know if they’re drunk or if the two men have been fighting or one has attacked the other, we don’t know if the man lying down is injured and someone’s given him a pint while he waits for an ambulance (odd as this is, I’ve seen it happen more than once), if drugs are involved or if either of the men struggle with alcoholism.

Sharing photographs of people who have fallen down in the street is beyond crass, cruel, and I honestly would have expected a lot better from people I know. Particularly of feminists who take an interesectional approach to social issues. Many of us have been in that situation, some of us through no fault of our own having been drugged or plied with more alcohol than we intended on drinking. One of the most common forms of ‘spiking’ a drink is people buying doubles instead of singles or topping up drinks so that someone loses track of their alcohol consumption. The coersion of ‘just one more’ when inhibitions are already down.

Men who are a part of ‘lad’ culture regularly boast of getting women drunk so as to get them into bed. Having spent some time staying at a pub while homeless (the landlady was very kind and offered me a place to sleep for a while) I have witnessed men doing all they can do get women intoxicated. I have tried to intervene for some, informed women they’re being given doubles, triples, and informing them when their drinks are topped up behind their back. Do you know what these things lead to? Being drop-down drunk.

Don’t think for a moment that the images which can end up circulated of intoxicated revellers are all perfectly innoccent because ‘in all likeliness..’, I know somebody locally who was the subject of such a photograph, taken of her on a bus after having had her drink spiked (the police were involved although I’ve no idea if it was drugs or alcohol). I don’t believe the photograph went beyond local circles but to say that it affected her would be an understatement. Last time I spoke to her, admittedly a few years ago now, she was still finding that people recognised her as ‘that lass who passed out on the bus’. People still laugh at her for being in a situation of vulnerability that was forced upon her while she was trying to have a nice Saturday night out with friends.

And this is the point, it’s a situation of extreme vulnerability some people are going through. Even if that vulnerability is self inflicted it could well be that they don’t have all that much control over it due to alcoholism or peer pressure/coersion (which anyone aware of social issues knows can be a very, very powerful thing). Many are at a point where they are largely helpless, not in full control of their actions or understanding what is going on around them. In this case, whatever has happened to the two people involved in the photograph, they have woken up to find themselves the subject of unending ridicule. This is something they cannot outrun because of one night where they clearly made some bad decisions. Global shaming, particularly for the man who could potentially be injured for he’s been photoshopped into so many images for laughs that it’s becoming a meme in itself.

How would you feel if it was you, through whatever circumstance listed above? How would you feel if it was a friend of yours and you knew the context to be a bad one?

Much like the premise of my last essay on here regarding consumerism and considering context, when it comes to pictures of people lying in the street, these are things that anyone who considers themselves to hold an intersectional approach to social issues should stop and think of. Equally anyone in health who has experience with alcoholics, people who have been drugged on a night out, or those who have been plied with more alcohol than they knew of should, as a consultant I know put it, know better.

Show some kindness. If you don’t know how those in the photo feel about it, don’t share it. Misfortunes around substance use and abuse are not a laughing matter.

Summary: I don’t believe it’s right to take photographs of people in vulnerable situations without their consent, let alone when they’re not fully in control of their faculties. There could be a lot of reasons a person has ended up in that situation; alcoholism, spiked drinks, trauma. When you laugh and share these photos, you are potentially mocking (usually working class) people in tragic situations. Even those deliberately getting themselves into that state, you’re laughing at vulnerability of them while they’re unaware their misfortune is being ridiculed online. When going viral, a person may be unable to escape it. Give it some thought.

Edit: Anita Sharma on Twitter has sent me this link to a pdf by the All-Party Parliamentary University Group which I recommend reading if you’d like to explore this side of abuse within lad culture. Some of the issues mentioned in this post which centre around that culture and behaviours towards [mostly] women which are prevalent in social situations involving alcohol are looked at in more depth and offers a wider context of the issues involved.

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on RedditShare on TumblrPin on PinterestEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

Comments are closed.